Why Don’t They Teach Kids How to Wash Clothes in School?


peacecorps.gov

peacecorps.gov

CHARACTER BUILDER. Washing clothes build character? Well, before I get to that, I notice how a lot of students–high school or college–don’t know a thing about manual clothes washing. Perhaps in developed countries this is not an issue (I heard that the way they did it there is to go to the laundry room, put the clothes inside the machine, and hit the on button). But in underdeveloped countries like the Philippines, it is.

If you don’t know how to wash clothes systematically, it reflects your home life or how you grew up at home as a teenager. You probably did nothing but watch TV, play video games, eat, sleep, and go out with friends. Lots of my friends grew up like that, and the other half of my friends grew up washing clothes and even fetching water as a daily chore. And you’d see the big difference–those who washed and fetched are definitely disciplined and have more patience with life’s vicissitudes. The other–they’re spoiled and easily get bored with life.

Oh yes, I take note of details like this. You see, I often do small researches among people in my sphere of influence and see what they do, how they react, and how they behave. And I have a large sphere of friends from all walks of life–from my grade school days to the present. And online social networking helps me a lot here. I’m the guy that quietly keeps in touch and makes new friends. I listen to their stories and take note of details in their lives. I normally do this on a daily basis to know more about life and share it with my readers.

And you know what I discovered? Training in systematic clothes washing made most teenagers think more responsibly and become more practical with life. And as they grow up they become wise with the use of their resources. And I also note that most folks who knew systematic clothes washing from their teenage years also did other house chores on a voluntary basis. They helped cooked meals, kept the house tidy (especially the toilet and kitchen), did gardening, took care of pets and gave them baths, and did sideline jobs while in college.

Why don’t they teach these important activities in school anymore? I mean, as a boy scout, I learned these things in school. It’s what we did in outdoor camping–cooked, built and managed fire, built our own makeshift tent, learned how to handle hunting knives safely, washed our clothes and dried them in a way that wouldn’t necessitate ironing when they dried up, economized on resources, gardening and taking care of trees, loved nature, and prayed.

Today, scouting is nothing but “bonding,” outdoor games and so-called team building.

I think they ought to have a special subject for this where they actually wash clothes systematically and dry them, and where they also learn how to clean the house, clean the toilet, and do real gardening. Kids learn this in a classroom setting or in armchairs–they hear about the theories, probably do a little of this and that, and that’s it. This does not equate to the discipline, science, and art of house chores that result to better character building.

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